Our classic cars

Ford Consul Corsair

Ford Consul Corsair  The Ford Consul Corsair was introduced in 1963 as Ford’s mid-sized saloon. Offered initially with a 1500cc in-line four cylinder engine, which was replaced in 1965 by a V4 1700cc, or a V4 2000cc unit. Many people felt that this was a detrimental move as the 1500cc Kent engine was far smoother. The styling was pure ‘American’, as was the fashion in the early sixties, with the Corsair being directly inspired by the Ford Thunderbirds of the era.  I have always loved Ford cars, especially the Consul Corsair. There was nothing else like it on British roads. I have owned a 1965 Corsair 1500 GT for over 20 years, but this particular car is currently undergoing restoration. I acquired my latest Corsair in September 2013.  Even though I am reliably informed that the car is an export model, it was bought new in Dudley in 1965 and has been in the same family ever since, until I bought it. The car is a rare two-door, which were built to order in the UK, and one of the last with the 1500cc straight four Kent engine. It has only covered 13,641 miles in the last 48 years and is completely original with the exception of the battery, a stainless steel exhaust system and the wheels and tyres – when I bought the car it still had cross-ply tyres!  The windscreen still bears the original tax disk holder along with the Ford factory instructions on how to use the dipped beam!  The car is not perfect and some paint has been touched up at some time, but it is very tidy and original – with that fantastic old-car smell. The doors close with the touch of a finger and there are no rattles or shakes. The engine runs smoothly and the car drives like it is new. There are one or two small jobs to be completed, such as cleaning up the dashboard and rear parcel shelf, before I start taking her to the shows. I am a member of the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and hope to be attending a few events with them in the coming year.  Steve P

The Ford Consul Corsair was introduced in 1963 as Ford’s mid-sized saloon. Offered initially with a 1500cc in-line four cylinder engine, which was replaced in 1965 by a V4 1700cc, or a V4 2000cc unit. Many people felt that this was a detrimental move as the 1500cc Kent engine was far smoother. The styling was pure ‘American’, as was the fashion in the early sixties, with the Corsair being directly inspired by the Ford Thunderbirds of the era.

Ford Consul Corsair  The Ford Consul Corsair was introduced in 1963 as Ford’s mid-sized saloon. Offered initially with a 1500cc in-line four cylinder engine, which was replaced in 1965 by a V4 1700cc, or a V4 2000cc unit. Many people felt that this was a detrimental move as the 1500cc Kent engine was far smoother. The styling was pure ‘American’, as was the fashion in the early sixties, with the Corsair being directly inspired by the Ford Thunderbirds of the era.  I have always loved Ford cars, especially the Consul Corsair. There was nothing else like it on British roads. I have owned a 1965 Corsair 1500 GT for over 20 years, but this particular car is currently undergoing restoration. I acquired my latest Corsair in September 2013.  Even though I am reliably informed that the car is an export model, it was bought new in Dudley in 1965 and has been in the same family ever since, until I bought it. The car is a rare two-door, which were built to order in the UK, and one of the last with the 1500cc straight four Kent engine. It has only covered 13,641 miles in the last 48 years and is completely original with the exception of the battery, a stainless steel exhaust system and the wheels and tyres – when I bought the car it still had cross-ply tyres!  The windscreen still bears the original tax disk holder along with the Ford factory instructions on how to use the dipped beam!  The car is not perfect and some paint has been touched up at some time, but it is very tidy and original – with that fantastic old-car smell. The doors close with the touch of a finger and there are no rattles or shakes. The engine runs smoothly and the car drives like it is new. There are one or two small jobs to be completed, such as cleaning up the dashboard and rear parcel shelf, before I start taking her to the shows. I am a member of the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and hope to be attending a few events with them in the coming year.  Steve PI have always loved Ford cars, especially the Consul Corsair. There was nothing else like it on British roads. I have owned a 1965 Corsair 1500 GT for over 20 years, but this particular car is currently undergoing restoration. I acquired my latest Corsair in September 2013.

Even though I am reliably informed that the car is an export model, it was bought new in Dudley in 1965 and has been in the same family ever since, until I bought it. The car is a rare two-door, which were built to order in the UK, and one of the last with the 1500cc straight four Kent engine. It has only covered 13,641 miles in the last 48 years and is completely original with the exception of the battery, a stainless steel exhaust system and the wheels and tyres – when I bought the car it still had cross-ply tyres!

Ford Consul Corsair  The Ford Consul Corsair was introduced in 1963 as Ford’s mid-sized saloon. Offered initially with a 1500cc in-line four cylinder engine, which was replaced in 1965 by a V4 1700cc, or a V4 2000cc unit. Many people felt that this was a detrimental move as the 1500cc Kent engine was far smoother. The styling was pure ‘American’, as was the fashion in the early sixties, with the Corsair being directly inspired by the Ford Thunderbirds of the era.  I have always loved Ford cars, especially the Consul Corsair. There was nothing else like it on British roads. I have owned a 1965 Corsair 1500 GT for over 20 years, but this particular car is currently undergoing restoration. I acquired my latest Corsair in September 2013.  Even though I am reliably informed that the car is an export model, it was bought new in Dudley in 1965 and has been in the same family ever since, until I bought it. The car is a rare two-door, which were built to order in the UK, and one of the last with the 1500cc straight four Kent engine. It has only covered 13,641 miles in the last 48 years and is completely original with the exception of the battery, a stainless steel exhaust system and the wheels and tyres – when I bought the car it still had cross-ply tyres!  The windscreen still bears the original tax disk holder along with the Ford factory instructions on how to use the dipped beam!  The car is not perfect and some paint has been touched up at some time, but it is very tidy and original – with that fantastic old-car smell. The doors close with the touch of a finger and there are no rattles or shakes. The engine runs smoothly and the car drives like it is new. There are one or two small jobs to be completed, such as cleaning up the dashboard and rear parcel shelf, before I start taking her to the shows. I am a member of the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and hope to be attending a few events with them in the coming year.  Steve PThe windscreen still bears the original tax disk holder along with the Ford factory instructions on how to use the dipped beam!

The car is not perfect and some paint has been touched up at some time, but it is very tidy and original – with that fantastic old-car smell. The doors close with the touch of a finger and there are no rattles or shakes. The engine runs smoothly and the car drives like it is new. There are one or two small jobs to be completed, such as cleaning up the dashboard and rear parcel shelf, before I start taking her to the shows. I am a member of the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and hope to be attending a few events with them in the coming year.

Ford Consul Corsair  The Ford Consul Corsair was introduced in 1963 as Ford’s mid-sized saloon. Offered initially with a 1500cc in-line four cylinder engine, which was replaced in 1965 by a V4 1700cc, or a V4 2000cc unit. Many people felt that this was a detrimental move as the 1500cc Kent engine was far smoother. The styling was pure ‘American’, as was the fashion in the early sixties, with the Corsair being directly inspired by the Ford Thunderbirds of the era.  I have always loved Ford cars, especially the Consul Corsair. There was nothing else like it on British roads. I have owned a 1965 Corsair 1500 GT for over 20 years, but this particular car is currently undergoing restoration. I acquired my latest Corsair in September 2013.  Even though I am reliably informed that the car is an export model, it was bought new in Dudley in 1965 and has been in the same family ever since, until I bought it. The car is a rare two-door, which were built to order in the UK, and one of the last with the 1500cc straight four Kent engine. It has only covered 13,641 miles in the last 48 years and is completely original with the exception of the battery, a stainless steel exhaust system and the wheels and tyres – when I bought the car it still had cross-ply tyres!  The windscreen still bears the original tax disk holder along with the Ford factory instructions on how to use the dipped beam!  The car is not perfect and some paint has been touched up at some time, but it is very tidy and original – with that fantastic old-car smell. The doors close with the touch of a finger and there are no rattles or shakes. The engine runs smoothly and the car drives like it is new. There are one or two small jobs to be completed, such as cleaning up the dashboard and rear parcel shelf, before I start taking her to the shows. I am a member of the Ford Corsair Owners’ Club and hope to be attending a few events with them in the coming year.  Steve P

Steve P

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